September Is For Sapphires – Greenland Ruby

Pink is Powerful!

The months of the year have been assigned a special gemstone since the early 1900s and sapphire, known also as the Wisdom Stone, is the birthstone for September representing intelligence, education, and the ability to make wise and good choices. Sapphires are also the 45th-anniversary gemstone and although confusing, a Sapphire Jubilee occurs after 65 years.

Credit: Lotus Gemology

Did you know that sapphires come in a rainbow of colors?

Most commonly known are the blue sapphires but it’s a surprise to most people to hear these gems can also be found in a variety of shades from violet, green to yellow, orange, purple, pinkish-orange (called Padparadscha), and PINK. Actually, rubies and sapphires are chemically almost exactly the same, both being a variety of the mineral corundum. The color diversity of rubies and pink sapphires is determined by the presence of Chromium; as it decreases so does the intensity, and the red becomes pink. These beauties are called Pink Sapphires.

The most famous lovers of pink sapphires are Her Royal Highness, Queen Elizabeth II, who has often been seen in a pink sapphire floral design brooch, as well as Princess Grace Kelly, who loved her delicate and very feminine pink jewels.

We can see why sapphires have been cherished for thousands of years!

Origins

Deposits of various colors of sapphire can be found on almost all continents in the world, including the United States (Montana) and most recently in Greenland, where it is the pink gems that we are so lucky to have. Pink sapphires are also known to be found in India, Sri Lanka, various parts of East Africa and Madagascar, Southeast Asia, and Australia.

The Greenland Ruby pink sapphire assortment ranges in color from fuchsia and hot pink to flattering shades of light and icy pink. Regardless of the saturation, each gem has unique microscopic inclusions that tell of it’s 3 billion-year-old journey through time and temperature.

Why we love Pink!

Pink is the color of universal love of oneself and of others, thought to bring harmony and inner peace. Though not one of the primary colors, pink is a less saturated and sweet side of the red and is the official color for girls.

Over the years, pink has become synonymous with many causes and emotions, taking on different identities depending on culture and time. Its symbolism is complex and its popularity is subject to so many influences.

Given the close connection with femininity, pink has been used as a symbolic color by groups supporting women; from the vast sea of pink “pussyhats” that swarmed the Women’s March in Washington DC in 2018 to the massive Breast Cancer Awareness organizations that have touched millions of lives all over the world, pink is powerful, and we love it!